The Blackberry Farm Cookbook: Four Seasons of Great Food and the Good Life

December 5, 2017 - Comment

Nestled in the blue mists of Tennessee’s Smoky Mountains, the 10,000-acre bucolic refuge of Blackberry Farm houses a top-rated small inn with one of the premier farm-to-table restaurants in the country.  This sumptuous cookbook offers a collection of recipes that are as inspired by the traditional rustic cooking of the mountainous south as they are

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Nestled in the blue mists of Tennessee’s Smoky Mountains, the 10,000-acre bucolic refuge of Blackberry Farm houses a top-rated small inn with one of the premier farm-to-table restaurants in the country.  This sumptuous cookbook offers a collection of recipes that are as inspired by the traditional rustic cooking of the mountainous south as they are by a fresh, contemporary, artistic sensibility. Some of the dishes are robust, others are astonishingly light, all are full of heart and surprise and flavor — and all are well within the reach of the home cook.

California has the French Laundry, Virginia has the Inn at Little Washington, and Tennessee has Blackberry Farm, where the indulgences of a luxury inn are woven together with odes to nature —  fly-fishing, hiking, foraging, bird watching, and heirloom gardening —  to create a new way of looking at the world, a way in which anything seems possible.

This is particularly true at the Inn’s table and in its award-winning wine cellar. To the farm’s master gardeners, food artisans and chefs, meals are an opportunity to express not only the earth and the culture of this remote spot, but also its spirit. On a spring day this might mean Rye Whiskey-Cured Trout with Fresh and Pickled Fennel, and the summer garden might inspire a Chilled Corn Soup with Garlic Custard, a papardelle of baby carrots, or a tomato terrine. In the cooler weather, game and traditionally preserved food —  cider-basted venison, a shell-bean and gamebird cassoulet, a dried apple stack cake or  Bourbon Apple Fried Pies —  keep conversation in front of the fire lively. For all its artfulness, however, Blackberry Farm’s garden-to-table cooking tends to be an ode to a well-loved cast iron skillet, a backyard smoker or a wood-fired grill.

In the foothills, you don’t eat to eat, you eat to talk, to remember and to imagine what you will eat tomorrow. In this book, the stories of the people who practice the traditional mountain food arts —  the bacon man, the heirloom gardener, the cheese maker and sausage man —  are woven together with the recipes, lore and regional history to reflect the spirit of the cooking at Blackberry Farm. Breathtaking photographs capture the magical world that surrounds the table —  the hills and rushing creeks, the lights and shadows of the forest, the moods and moments of the garden. From The Blackberry Farm Cookbook: Fig Tart

Fig jam intensifies the fruit flavor in this tart. We make our own jam, but high-quality commercial versions work nicely as well. We like the free-form shape and rustic feel of the tart and have shaped them smaller to make individual tarts and larger to feed a crowd. Whipped cream, slightly sweetened, is a nice addition.–Sam Beall

Ingredients

1/2 recipe basic pastry (recipe below) 1/4 cup fig jam 1 pound fresh figs, stemmed and halved lengthwise 1/3 cup plus 1 teaspoon sugar 1/4 cup heavy cream 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1 large egg 2 tablespoons milk

(Makes eight servings)

Directions

1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly butter a baking sheet and set it aside.

2. Divide the pastry in half. On a lightly floured surface, roll each piece of dough into a 9-inch circle. Place the pastry on the prepared baking sheet; overlapping the two circles a little on one side is okay as the edges will be folded in later. Spread 2 tablespoons of jam evenly over each piece of pastry, leaving a 1 1/2-inch border. Arrange the figs over the jam. Cover the tarts with plastic wrap and set them aside.

3. In a small saucepan, cook 1/3 cup of the sugar over medium-high heat without stirring until it melts and turns amber in color. Remove the pan from the heat and carefully stir in the cream and butter, stirring until the mixture is smooth. Brush the tops of the figs with the caramel mixture. Fold the edge of the pastry over the outer edge of the figs, pleating the dough to hold it in place.

4. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg and milk. Brush the edges of the pastry with the egg mixture and then sprinkle with the remaining 1 teaspoon of sugar. Bake for about 25 minutes, until the pastry is golden brown and the figs are just tender. Serve warm or at room temperature, cut into generous wedges.

Basic Pastry 3 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup plus 3 tablespoons shortening 1 large egg 1/3 cup plus 1 to 3 tablespoons ice water 1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar

(Makes pastry for two 9- or 10-inch pie shells or one double-crust 9-inch pie)

1. Place the flour and salt in a food processor and pulse to combine. Add the shortening and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Transfer to a medium bowl and set aside.

2. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg, 1/3 cup of the ice water, and the vinegar. Pour the egg mixture over the flour mixture and stir with a fork just until the dough comes together. If the dough is too dry, add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time.

3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead gently into a ball. Divide the ball in half and flatten each piece into a disk about 1 inch thick. Wrap each disk in plastic and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes, or up to 3 days; the dough can also be frozen for up to 6 months and defrosted overnight in the refrigerator prior to using.

Comments

GeeGee says:

Lovely cookbook with approachable recipes I purchased this cookbook since I live in the area and am familiar with Blackberry Farm and its reputation for excellence. I have toured the farm through a University of TN alumni summer college. That said, I find the cookbook to be lovely to look at and the recipes to be very doable for someone who likes to cook at home. I like the simplicity of the recipes and the fact that the ingredients are easy to find. I have made the Summer Squash Casserole, which is outstanding–I would never of…

rhonda says:

It is pretty to look at Ok, I must confess this cookbook is food porn. It is beautiful and inspiring. It makes one want to visit the blackberry farm. The photos are perfection and the recipes sound delicious. However, they seem to laborious. I must confess I have had this book for some time now and haven’t made anything from it. So, this says something in itself. Every-time that I have wanted to, the recipes just seem too long or aren’t in season to make. It is such a beautiful book though and the recipes are…

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